More than an apple a day

More than an apple a day

by Beth Shaw | 4/10/2016

Yes, an apple a day is a great idea, but that's not the only thing that'll keep the doctor away. To really ensure you get the nutrients your body requires, you'll need to incorporate a variety of nutrient-rich foods filled with vitamins C and E, antioxidants, beta-carotene, and bacteria-fighting properties. Look for fresh fruits and veggies that are in season and local, as much as possible.

 

Beta-Carotene

Apricots, asparagus, beets, broccoli, cantaloupe, carrots, non-GMO corn, green peppers, kale, mangos, turnip and collard greens, nectarines, peaches, pink grapefruit, pumpkin, squash, spinach, sweet potatoes, tangerines, tomatoes, and watermelon

 

Vitamin C

Berries, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cantaloupe, cauliflower, grapefruit, honeydew melon, kale, kiwi, mangoes, nectarines, oranges, papaya, red, green, or yellow peppers, strawberries and tomatoes

 

Vitamin E

Broccoli, carrots, chard, mustard and turnip greens, mangoes, nuts, papayas, pumpkin, red peppers, spinach, and sunflower seeds

 

Antioxidants

Apples, beans, berries, eggplant, onions, prunes, tea

 

An easy way to get the immune-boosters you need to stay healthy is to eat with your eyes. That means, go for color and diversity because each fruit and veggie has its own unique way of nourishing your internal organs. There's a reason you eat soup when you're sick: you can throw in a wide assortment of veggies to contribute to your cure. Also, the heat from the soup, especially if you add in a little spice, will make you sweat, which will help clear out your sinuses and help flush out the toxins in your body. Make sure to add a healthy amount of garlic to whatever you're cooking. Its active ingredient, allicin, is a natural antibiotic, which can help you fight off anything that ails you. It also contains high levels of manganese, calcium, vitamin B1, B6, and C, phosphorus, copper, potassium, selenium, and trypotophan.